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Massive Attack’s Plan to Cut Down Carbon Emissions in Music Industry

The English trip hop group, Massive Attack, have teamed up with scientists and intend to reduce carbon emissions in the music industry.

A report entitled “Roadmap to Super Low Carbon Live Music” was recently produced by the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research and commissioned by Massive Attack. It recommends that musicians should stop using private jets and bring less gear on tour. It also intends to phase out the use of diesel generators by 2025. 

“To really decarbonize live music, you need to start doing it right from the inception of a tour,” said Professor Carly McLachlan, who led the research. 

Massive Attack have been vocal about climate issues throughout the years and have taken measures to plan future tours by travelling in trains, building more easily transportable sets, using local providers and encouraging the use of green energy.

Bandmember Robert “3D” del Naja also criticized the government for not doing enough to support the industry in reducing carbon emissions. 

The NME website quotes 3D saying “but where is the government planning to support the rate of adaption we’re going to need to hit compatibility with [the Paris agreement]? It doesn’t seem to exist.”

Governments have historically been generous to profitable companies that leave large carbon footprints. It will be interesting to see how they react to this report, which would insinuate them to leave many of their profiteering colleagues behind and build relations with lesser known ones who are more concerned with preserving the planet than seeking financial gain. Many spoiled rock stars will definitely be disappointed if they aren’t allowed to fly their private jets anymore and are forced to share gear with other bands.

NYC, NYCTastemakers, massiveattack, triphop, climatechange, carbonfootprint, emissions,

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